assets/images/stock_images/stones leaves 940.jpg

Meet Sam Reynolds at Stand 1203 Camexpo

Meet Sam Reynolds at Stand 1203 Camexpo

 

 

 Blogs, cancer patient, cancer patients, surviving cancer, cancer awareness, cancer blogs uk, Cancer support, help for cancer patients, coping with cancer, life with cancer, cancer stories, cancer blogs, cancer survivors, cancer life, cancer living, Advice for cancer patients, dealing with cancer

 

 

My name is Sam Reynolds. I am thirty six and I was first diagnosed with oestrogen receptive breast cancer at twenty six. Despite me being a third consecutive generation affected by this, it is not genetic. In the last ten years I have fought breast cancer three times and after my third diagnosis in February this year and a double mastectomy and reconstruction, I've found writing to be a fantastic, therapeutic way to offer solidarity and hope to other younger patients who are dealing with the impact cancer has on an active life. There are so many different things we can do to help ourselves after being unwell and it can be very overwhelming, but after all my experiences, I'm hoping to offer a way of simplifying these options, making 'life after cancer' a little less daunting for those who want to be pro active with their recovery or who simply need a hand to hold. 

 

1. How did you gain the experience necessary to become part of the Beauty Despite Cancer team?

Personal family experience and surviving three diagnosis under thirty five myself. 


2. What are you looking forward to most about joining the rest of the team at CAMEXPO?

Meeting other amazing positive and pro active people, being an active part of the BDC team and reaching out to others as well as learning more about nutrition, beauty and wellbeing. 


3. When will you be at Stand 1203?

Saturday 10-1pm 


4. Where can we find you when you are not at CAMEXPO Stand 1203?

@samboreynolds1 on Twitter, Sam Reynolds on Facebook and my blog on SamSpaceblog.wordpress.com 


5. What kind of questions do you usually get asked? 

What sort of boundaries do you have set in place while mentoring, so you can protect yourself and your own healing? 

What's the best way of helping someone through cancer? 


6. What can you do to help friends and family of those going through treatment?

Be an ear, a shoulder and that little bit of sunshine. Be a hand to hold. Just Listen. 


7. Tell us about someone you have helped

An acquaintance in our village was recently diagnosed with breast cancer after meeting me coincidentally one day and me telling her I had had breast cancer. She had never checked herself before, did so the next day and found a lump. A week later she was having a lumpectomy. Now she is undergoing chemo. We have met up a few times and every chemo day I leave a little package on her doorstep. A little surprise can do wonders at a time like that. I gave her a chemo survival pack on her first day too; lots of practical little things to help with insomnia, sickness, healing, nurturing and skin care. I've been on the end of a phone for her via text and email whenever she has questions or concerns. It helps she is being treated by my same team but her strength is amazing and when she told me I had saved her life and was her angel, I knew my own challenges had finally help make a difference to someone else. 


8. What do your clients say to you most often?

I don't have clients at the moment (that's a work in progress!) but a lot of people say they like the style and honesty of my writing and feel reassured by my positivity and how I make it all feel less scary. That I'm like the Cheshire Cat! 


9. What is the question you are asked most frequently?

Has it all changed me? 

Can I talk to a friend of a friend because they have just been diagnosed. 


10. Do you have a favourite query?

I would like it to be something like; Can you help guide me through this rabbit hole and make it less overwhelming? Or What things did you do to improve your wellbeing after cancer to keep you positive / calm / grounded? 



Leave A Comment





Allowed tags: <b><i><br>Add a new comment:


Comments (0)